Big trees

When I am out scouting for trees, I often come across some noteworthy examples, usually because they are large. Even though I may not mill them, I can’t help but take a picture.

This giant sycamore log was too hollow to mill, but too big to not photograph. It was hidden in the woods within a quarter mile of my shop and was exposed during development of the land.

This giant sycamore log was too hollow to mill, but too big to not photograph. It was hidden in the woods within a quarter mile of my shop and was exposed during development of the land.

Martin likes big logs too. This black oak log yielded slabs with sections over 54

Martin Goebel likes big logs too. This black oak log yielded slabs with sections over 54″ wide. (Click here to read more about this log.)

Even the branches are giant on this white oak.

Even the branches are giant on this white oak. (Click here to read more about this log.)

From this angle the vase shape is not as evident, but with park-goers directly beneath it, you can see just how big this tree is.

From this angle the vase shape is not as evident, but with park-goers directly beneath it, you can see just how big this tree is. (Click here to read more about this and other elm trees.)

This tree is even bigger than it looks like from the road (I am not a tiny person).

This tree is even bigger than it looks like from the road. (Click here to read more about this white oak.)

That's not me, but that is the

That’s not me, but that is the “Biggest Burr Oak” after it was cleaned up and back on the ground. (Click here to read more about this giant burr oak.)

My old Corley mill getting ready to disassemble a huge cherry log.

My old Corley mill getting ready to disassemble a huge cherry log. (Click here to read about more big cherry logs.)

This photo was from a woodworking show in Sacramento (they have bigger trees!)

This photo was from a woodworking show in Sacramento (they have bigger trees!)

Cutting the sycamore log in half for loading and milling.

Cutting the sycamore log in half for loading and milling. (Read more about this log by clicking here.)

3 responses to “Big trees”

  1. Alice Haun says :

    I found this site by looking for doyle log scale. I have a large (48″ bark to bark) English walnut (Western Pa.) and am tired of cleaning up the dead branches that freeze back and fall off. I wanted to get an estimate of BF. Enjoyed photos thanks!!

    • wunderwoods says :

      Board Feet is a measure of volume, so you need the diameter on the skinny end of the log and the length of the log to figure out the bd. ft. The scale posted on my website should work for you, since I assume that your walnut tree is not over 44″ on the skinny end. If it is, then you have a ginormous tree. Also, you are calling it English walnut. I haven’t seen it to verify, but they are usually American black walnut.

  2. Paul Boles / LittleBear Timber says :

    I have Large trees in the 48″ to 96″ range. Standing dead and on the ground. Species inc. Incense Cedar, 4 kinds of Oak, White/Sugar Pine; Sycamore, Soft Maple, Walnut, Mtn Alder, and verious others under 48″. Would like to find a woodsman from back East to do some trading with. Just devorced and looking for a reason. Love this site and the good old boys on it. Thanks for all the valuable knowledge.

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